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Common ancestor of Han Chinese, Japanese and Koreans

Common ancestor of Han Chinese, Japanese and Koreans dated to 3000 – 3600 years ago

Dr. Shuhua Xu, one of the authors of the study, has dated the most recent common ancestor of the three major East Asian ethnic groups to the time of the Shang dynasty using a genome-wide study. The study published in Hereditas found that the three groups – Han Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese – share a common ancestor who lived around 3,800 years ago.

Dr. Xu and his colleagues used a technique called genome-wide association study (GWAS) to analyze the DNA of over 1,000 people from the three groups. GWAS can identify genetic variants that are associated with certain traits or diseases. In this case, the researchers were looking for genetic variants that were shared by all three groups.

The researchers found that the three groups share some genetic variants associated with eye color, hair color, and skin color. They also found that the three groups have different genetic variants associated with certain diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease.

The findings of the study suggest that the three major East Asian ethnic groups have a shared genetic history that dates back to the Shang dynasty.

The study found that the three groups have diverged genetically over time, and this is reflected in the different genetic variants that they share.

Dr. Xu said that the findings of the study could help to improve our understanding of the genetic basis of certain diseases that are more common in East Asian populations. He also said that the findings could help to shed light on the history of human migration in East Asia.

Bronze Tiger from Shang dynasty
Bronze Tiger from Shang dynasty

Han Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people are genetically closely related and share a common gene pool. However, they have also diverged genetically over time, due to factors such as geographical isolation, cultural practices, and natural selection.

The distinct genetic clusters of the three groups reflect their divergence, which corresponds to their geographical locations.

Genome-wide variation data can distinguish between Han Chinese, Japanese, and Korean individuals without much ambiguity.

This ability has important implications for research on human genetics and population history. Researchers can use genome-wide variation data to study the genetic basis of diseases that are more common in East Asian populations. They can also use this data to track the movement of people in East Asia over time.

In general, genetic differences between Japanese and Han Chinese are larger than that between Korean and Han Chinese.

The genetic differences between the three East Asian groups are relatively small, but they are still significant. In general, genetic differences between Japanese and Han Chinese are larger than those between Korean and Han Chinese. This is likely due to the fact that the Japanese and Han Chinese populations have been separated for a longer period of time.

In addition to the overall genome-wide differentiation, there are also genes that show considerable differences between the three groups. For example, several highly differentiated variants that are thought to be associated with human adaptation to pathogens in different local regions are enriched in the CD46 gene, which is located on chromosome 1.

This image displays that genome-wide variation data separate Han Chinese (red and green dots), Korean (blue dots), and Japanese individuals (yellow dots) into distinct clusters. Moreover, the genetic clusters almost perfectly correspond to the geographical locations where individuals are living. Image taken from article.

This study provides new insights into the genetics of East Asians. However, we need to conduct further research to fully understand the complex history of these three influential ethnic groups. In particular, we need to conduct more research to understand the genetic basis of distinct phenotypic variations among the three groups.

Conclusion

The genetic data presented in this study suggest that Han Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people are genetically closely related. And all derived their ancestry from a common gene pool. However, they have also diverged genetically over time, due to factors such as geographical isolation, cultural practices, and natural selection.

The distinct genetic clusters of the three groups reflect their divergence. These clusters correspond to their geographical locations.

The genetic differences between the three groups are reflected in the way their DNA is clustered.  This clustering is based on the geographical locations of the groups. This means that people from the same region tend to have more similar DNA than people from different regions.

This clustering is likely due to the fact that people from the same region have been more likely to interbreed with each other over time. This has led to the accumulation of genetic similarities within each region, and to the divergence of the genetic makeup of the three groups.

 

 

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